What Exactly Is A Plant-based Diet, And Why Is Eating Plant-based So Beneficial?


Vegan Meal: Hasselback Japanese Sweet Potato, Chimichurri Brussels Sprouts, Quinoa + Sweet Potato, Green Salad
Vegan Meal: Hasselback Japanese Sweet Potato, Chimichurri Brussels Sprouts, Quinoa + Sweet Potato, Green Salad

Shifting to a plant-based or more plant-rich diet is growing in popularity in the mainstream for a variety of reasons. Retail sales of plant-based foods in the U.S. grew 6.2% in 2021 over a booming year of growth in 2020. Currently, the plant-based market value is $7.4 billion - an all-time high!


But what, exactly, is a plant-based diet? And why is eating plant-based so beneficial? Let’s explore that. If you're curious about making the switch to a plant-based diet, this post is a great place to start! These questions will be answered:

  • Why are more people switching to a plant-based diet?

  • What is a plant-based diet versus a plant-rich diet and veganism?

  • What are the benefits of a plant-based diet?

  • What can you eat on a plant-based diet?

  • How can I make the switch to a plant-based diet?

Let's begin shall we.


Why are more people switching to a plant-based diet?


It’s an exciting time where plants are popular! There are many reasons why more people are switching to a plant-based diet. Here are some common reasons.


Climate crisis and the environment

As the climate crisis worsens and ecosystems are in a state of collapse, more and more people are becoming conscious of how their diet and food choices have an impact on climate change and the environment.


According to the FAO, total emissions from global livestock represents 14.5% of all anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions.


Slaughterhouses are a leading source of water pollution in the U.S. In 2019, more than 28 million pounds of nitrogen and phosphorus from slaughterhouses was released into our country's streams and rivers. One of the results of this water pollution is a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico near the foot of the Mississippi river that's the size of the state of New Jersey.


Beef by far has the largest carbon footprint of all foods with emissions equivalent to coal, and is a leading cause of deforestation, water usage, water and air pollution, species extinction, and combined with other meats is contributing to antibiotic resistance which WHO has declared one of the top 10 global public health threats facing humanity.